More NetBeans 6.5 Developer Reviews…

1. NetBeans 6.5 Released With PHP And Grails Support — The Untangled Web, 12/2
James is happy with the "bushel basket of enhancements and improvements" in NetBeans 6.5. Highlighting the inclusion of PHP and Grails as the most noteworthy of the new features, he felt that developers will save hours of frustration by speeding up coding practices with code-completion and debugging features.
NetBeans
2. My New IDE: NetBeans — Kevin van Zonneveld, 12/2
Kevin tested out NetBeans 6.5 as an alternative to his usual IDE, Eclipse. He immediately found NetBeans easier to use. Kevin was surprised to see how SVN, CVS, CSS, SQL and even support for jQuery were already included, whereas in Eclipse it all had to be added manually. He also mentioned that adding features was simple, and the plug-in system always "just works."

3. Best IDE IN JAVA – NetBeans 6.5 OpenSource IDE — Fall in to Java, 12/2
Mahasarathi described NetBeans as a free, open-source IDE for software developers that offers all the tools users needed to create professional desktop, enterprise, web and mobile applications in Java, C/C++ and a variety of dynamic languages. He found it extremely easy to install and could use straight out of the box.

4. NetBeans 6.5 review — CodeUtopia, 12/1
Jani Hartikainen tried out NetBeans 6.5 and its new PHP related functionality. He cited examples of NetBeans being better than Zend Studio with code-assist for built-ins that displays more information and links to PHP manual. He was elated with "free" NetBeans offering more features than the commercial big names. He concluded, "NetBeans 6.5 is officially my new favorite PHP/web-dev IDE."

5. And now NetBeans 6.5 is there in my Ubuntu-8.10 — James Selvakumar’s Blog, 11/30
James Selvakumar, who had been using NetBeans since version 4.1, found the recent 6.5 release simply "fantastic!" He loved NetBeans because it was fast, responsive and sported amazingly new cool features. James also noticed that installing NetBeans in Ubuntu was very easy, and hence decided to give it a go on his Ubuntu-8.10.

6. The Elegance of NetBeans — Drawing a Blank, 11/30
Jason Whaley had used Eclipse for approximately 90% of his work on Java applications. He decided to give NetBeans 6.5 a quick try and was pleasantly surprised to notice that its maven integration was as simplistic and direct as one could have imagined. Jason remarked upon the elegance of the IDE and how seamlessly it integrated with his Mac OS X UI.

7. NetBeans Rich Client Platform: A Seven-Part Video Series — cld.blog-city.com, 11/29
Charles Ditzel noted that even in a world filled with Flex, JavaFX and SilverLight, Rich Client Platform (RCP) and plugin (or module)-based systems like NetBeans and Eclipse could flourish because RCP platforms offered the best ways to create large, coherent, distribute and modular applications. He informed users that there were many examples of NetBeans RCP applications, out of which the most compelling one was BlueMarine.

8. NetBeans, your IDE, and your community — John O’Conner’s Blog, 11/25
John O’Conner submitted a bug against NetBeans 6.1. When a NetBeans engineer was able to evaluate the problem, John received an email loaded with comments and questions just for him. He exclaimed, "What an amazing experience! I was impressed by the team’s commitment to engage with its community, to interact directly with an individual." He was even more surprised to get another follow-up email letting him know that the bug fix had been integrated into NetBeans 6.5.

9. NetBeans 6.5 + Glassfish v3 Prelude + Jersey 1.0 — Simon’s Blog, 11/24
Simon was excited to witness the release of some great software coming out of Sun Microsystems, and commented, "I recommend giving a new combination of Sun software a try: the just-released NetBeans 6.5 IDE; the just-released Glassfish v3 Prelude app server; and Jersey 1.0." With this combination, developers can design, implement and deploy web services in a very timely and productive manner.

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